Party Games for adults: Make your own DIY or buy them at the store (tips!) ?

adults playing a party game

Fun Party Games for Groups of Adults

make 'em yourself, or buy them in the store?

adults playing a party game

Games are booming. It was true last year and before, probably still be true the next. Naturally, party games are booming too and I couldn’t help but notice games I used to make myself getting a professional makeover.

Question is, which is the better party game for adults? DIY or store-bought?

You can download a lot of Print and Play PDF’s online. Those are PDF files with printed cards that you have to print, cut up into cards and if you have some time on your hands: sleeve (putting the piece of paper in a plastic cover).

Let’s look at some of our favourites. We put our own creations all the way at the end, completely free to try.

1. Werewolves

This is the one that inspired me to write the article, so why not go ahead and talk about this game first. We spent countless nights playing Werewolves at camp.

Not 1 but 2 official versions (check the rules using the links):

SPECS?

Time: 10 – 30 minutes (depending on # players) Age: 10 and up

HOW?

Using some good ol’ playing cards and bottlecaps. Each card corresponds to a certain character you’re assigned (e.g. we used clubs for the werewolves, hearts for villagers, etc) you might require a little shared cheat sheet to keep track of all the roles, but once you memorize them you’re good to go!

VERDICT?

pro: free! endless variations possible cons: no expansions no artwork so: if you want the basic game, you might as well use playing cards

2. Black Stories

If you haven’t played this one yet, it’s pretty simple: a narrator describes a vague situation, more often than not a gruesome one. The other players take turns guessing the details. The one who solves it, draws and narrates the next card. Repeat ad nauseum.

SPECS?

# players: 2 – 15

Time: 20 minutes (depending on # players)

Age: 12 and up

HOW?

Again, a camp classic: tell a riddle, the others can only ask yes-or-no questions, add some gore and/or insane details to spruce it up

VERDICT?

pro: you don’t need anything on you, it might inspire you to be a little more creative

cons: you need a REALLY good memory if you want to remember all those crazy scenarios

so: Buy a copy only if you want to play an entire night or want to play it competitively (store bought means the difficulty of cards is much more balanced) otherwise, stick to your own child-like imagination, it’s a precious gift

3. Cards Against Humanity

The tagline says it all: a party game for horrible people. Cards in black and white show either sentences with fill-in-the-blank statements that players can complete with other cards with (often non-PC) words on them. 

SPECS?

# players: 6 – 8

Time: 30 minutes

Age: 16 and up

HOW?

Use pen & paper (lots of it). Each player writes down (on different pieces of paper) 5 fill-in-the-gap sentences, and 10 words that might fit in those gaps. Create standard fill-in-the-gap sentences but use offensive words to contrast them.

VERDICT?

The sheer amount of cards makes it next to impossible to create your own version that will be as good as the original. Luckily, a free print & play is available.

4. Time's Up!

Each player gets 5 scraps of paper to  write down whatever comes to mind (don’t show these to the other players). The scraps are folded and placed in a reciptical. Players put themselves in teams and draw every piece of paper each round until there aren’t any left. Then points are counted (1 for each paper) and all pieces are placed in the reciptical for the next round. Repeat for every round.

SPECS?

# players: 4 – 12

Time: 60 minutes (depending on # players)

Age: 12 and up

HOW?

Scraps of paper, pen and some kind of bag/box (best: velvet pouch with golden tassles, but an empty chips bag works just as well). Play 4 rounds in this order:

  1. Explain the word normally (no rhyming or translations)
  2. Sherades
  3. describe using only 1 word
  4. Use only sounds (this is the best round)

VERDICT?

pro: you get to choose what’s on the cards! That means inside jokes, personal references, risqué stuff, random absurdity > whatever you (and your friends) think is funniest.

cons: that awkward moment when you’ve finished writing yours while the others are still pondering ‘what the perfect card would be’ while you’re shouting at them ‘Write anything! Let’s start the game already’.

so much better if you make it yourself. I recommend the store-bought version only if you’re playing with kids or total strangers you might have nothing in common with.

5. DEER LORD!

Duel other players while simultaneously ‘doing things’ obvious enough that other players see it, but don’t be too obvious or they might catch you in the act by yelling: DEER LORD!

SPECS?

# players: 4 – 8

Time: 30 minutes (depending on # players)

Age: 12 and up

HOW?

Download the P&P, cut the cards and voila! The download comes with 6 different expansions, tailored to player personality types.

VERDICT?

pro:  best game of the bunch. Available in a lot of different languages

cons: Takes time to cut up all of those cards

Game of our own making. Ideal to break the ice at a party or as a pre-game before a board game night. Make sure you have the right expansions though.

5. Sound of Sirens

Let sirens sing in 4 music genres to attract ships and send ’em crashing on the cliffs!

Sabotage the others, loot treasure and conjure sea monsters. Wreck a ship and win the game!

SPECS?

# players: 2 – 4

Time: 10 minutes / player

Age: 10 and up

HOW?

Download the P&P, cut the cards and maybe sleeve ’em. Possibility to go all out 4 this one since you can download files to create your own components with a lasercutter.

VERDICT?

pro:  Great for all ages, beautiful artwork. Free PDF to download the Sound of Sirens (check the bottom of the page)

cons: Prepare to refill the colour cartridge on your printer after printing the PDF.

Homemade game. A lot of effort went into this one…

Have your own Print & Plays to share? Don’t hesitate to let us know! We’d love to try them!

how to prototype board games with a laser cutter

lasercutting board game prototyping

A makerspace (also known as techshops, makerlabs or fablabs) is a place where you can make use of new technologies, such as lasercutters and 3D printers, and the knowhow of its community members to create pretty much anything you want. In our case, that’s prototypes for upcoming games!

In ‘The Sound of Sirens’, you control merfolk of different musical genres to lure ships to their death. Initially, these ships were just playing cards, face-up on the table, but we wanted to make things a little more exciting. So we designed 3D ships that serve as ‘card holders’, turning the playing cards into billowing sails. It all works on tension and friction, so no glue necessary (keeping the cards nice and tidy)

lasercut-ships

ship-assembly

Before you start lasercutting, there’s 4 things you need to check

Step 1: warm up your machine

We used a BRM LASERCUTTER 120X90 (100 W)

lasercut BRM machine

Step 2: check your materials

We used plywood with thickness 3.4mm or 1.4 inches

measure tool

Step 3: prep and download your files

The 2 important parameters when laser cutting are

  • Speed: how quickly the laser moves
  • Power: how strong the laser beams

Even at incredible speeds, this lasercutter is still accurate to 0.1 millimeter. But faster speeds also mean less energy can be released on a single point. This means that sometimes the material isn’t cut all the way through and you have to start over.

Proper testing before you start is vital! Try and cut a small circle out of your material with a preset speed & power and see whether you get through all the way and how easy it is to punch out the pieces. Adjust speed and power accordingly, until you reach the desired result. Only then start cutting your actual project.

Step 4: set the origin point

We use the software Lasercut 5.3

Lacercut program preview

The blue dot in the top right corner represents the origin point. That’s how you tell the laser cutter where to start cutting.

Step 5: Cut away!

…then, cut away! But if you need some more in-depth info about the process, and some guidelines don’t be afraid to ask!

lasercutting game pieces for prototyping 10x speed
bilder print and play pdf preview

Did you know?

we send PDF files of our best card games to everyone who subscribes

  1. lasercut AND pdf files with components & cards to print -cut- play
  2. Rules included
  3. Completely free


how to create creative games

Here at Monkeyshine, we go bananas for creative games.

Because here’s the thing: if you leave enough room for imagination, people will come up with ways to tackle challenges you would have never thought of yourself. Pictionary is the most well-known example of such a creative game, but there are plenty of titles that use a similar game mechanic and take it to the next level.

Continue reading “how to create creative games”